Workflow: Interaction triggers

In the RND test project one of the most important systems I developed was the interaction trigger system.

This system is simply a method of binding an action (ie “Interact”) and a specifier, and then wrapped to make a ‘broadcast signal’.

This broadcast signal is then sent. Because the broadcast signal can optionally contain a ‘target’, only those matching the target description can be made to respond to the signal.

The importance of a system like this is the ability to make level-specific scripts. I’ll give a test case from the RND project.

  • In Tiled, a marker is created with a name. This is the trigger name, which can be anything as long as it can be uniquely identified.
  • In C2, a ‘On GridMove reach target’ action is bound so that it wraps the reaching of the tile with the trigger name of the marker it has reached.
  • On reach target, the trigger is sent to a BroadcastTrigger function, which accepts the trigger name, and the intended target of the trigger, if any. The target is comma-delimited, so multiple targets can be specified.
  • The BroadcastTrigger function looks at the targets, tokenises them, and then applies the ‘receivedtrigger’ variable of each of the instances that are able to accept triggers. It applies them only to the targets specified, or all instances if no target was specified.
  • Note that a family called f_trigger_receiver was made and the receivedtrigger variable is called ‘f_receivedtrigger’ in order that BroadcastTrigger can efficiently send it to those concerned.
  • In the level-specific script, the intended target is waiting for its specific f_receivedtrigger to change. BroadcastTrigger would have changed it.
  • When it does, it fires off the events there.

In addition to the trigger, level-specific behaviours are specified, and can override the default AI of any object. This is why this is important, because the scripting is done in a separate event sheet (ie logic) and not predefined in the main logic.

Now, other actions are bound, as needed, to the BroadcastTrigger. For example, in the RND project, the On reach target trigger condition was the first one I implemented. But quickly afterwards, it was easy enough to bind the TalkToNPC function, or the InteractWithNPC function to the broadcast.

Of course, the trigger name changed. In the TalkToNPC trigger, the trigger name was "talk "&cmover.name in which the ‘talk’ keyword was appended by the actual variable name of the NPC that was talked to. The name of the NPC talked to was embedded in the signal and no target was specified because the logic was that either the player or the game world was the receiver. But, it is also possible, or even more beneficial if indeed the recipient of the ‘talk’ action was put in to the trigger target, as I did with the next implementation.

I implemented an ‘InteractWithNPC’ action in the same way, but included the recipient of the ‘interact’ action as the target. In the level script it was intended to add to the accomps to keep track who had been interacted with.

The BroadcastTrigger concept is just a concept, but seems to be a very flexible one, as I am using it currently to design a generic kind of interaction behaviour between a single ‘Useitem’ action to a host of different possible objects, each with their varying results. It’s this reason why BroadcastTrigger is useful, because behaviours are defined in the event sheet, and can be contextual as well as part of the main logic.

 

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