The fun is in the making…

There are two kinds of people. People who like to play, and people who like the make things.  And among those who like to make things, I can see two more kinds of people between them:

  1. Those who like making stuff.
  2. Those who like having made it.

Those who like making stuff, consequently, eventually — ideally — like the fact they made it.

And then there is a kind of person who prefers to have done it already. Of course, if it were already done before he started on it, then he couldn’t be considered a creator — and he wants to create. But if he could do it with a push of a button, or use an Imagino-matic device, that would be the most ideal situation.

But how much work does he want to do? Does he want to work just enough to feel like he’s earned a six-pack from a 2-minute calisthenic workout? Or is it like giving birth to a baby?

There’s more than a line, or a degree, or a quantification that crosses the boundaries of convenience and perseverance. How much automation is there before it’s actually automation? How much are we really putting in for the amount we’re getting back?

The nature of software is that we build on top of one another. We don’t write Assembly because there is no practical benefit to it.  But now, I ask a different question: When it comes down to it, would you be willing to start from scratch? It’s not about delineating degrees of laziness versus masochism. Instead, it is an attitude, an approach to life and learning.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with taking an easier route, especially if you took ‘hard’ to get to ‘easy’: you’re worth your own weight, like any good SAS trooper. But some people don’t want to take ‘hard’ at all. They just want to be shown a way that produces results. They don’t see problems as natural curiosities; for them, they’re irritants, not accelerants.

In the CG industry where I work, there are many varied roles, and people vary a lot in this regard. An animator has animation skills and he doesn’t have the inclination to rig a character, and I wouldn’t hold it upon him to do so. But I would expect him to be committed to all things animation. A modeller may not take interest in matchmoving, but his anatomy should be solid.

So it surprises me that there are so-called game devs who feel insulted to have been forced to troubleshoot their own game-related problems. But aren’t game devs supposed to regard game development problems the very point of game development? Isn’t this what ‘making a game’ is all about? Isn’t this actually the fun part?  ‘Making my game’ is supposedly what we enjoy. But in fact, what some people actually mean is ‘Seeing my game made’.

I don’t know. Maybe I think too old-school. I look at 2400AD and think Chuck Bueche, and the whole lot of them back then, were having loads of fun playing around with bits and pixels. And I am having tons of fun, too, and every bit and byte grateful that in this day and age we have such an easy time making games. But the thing is, I wouldn’t mind it at all if it were much harder.

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